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Welcome to The Center for Theoretical Biological Physics

The Center for Theoretical Biological Physics (CTBP) is one of ten Physics Frontiers Centers established by the Physics Division of the National Science Foundation Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS). CTBP is also sponsored by the Division of Molecular and Cell Biology (MCB). Additional support comes from the Division of Chemistry (CHE) and the Division of Materials Research (DMR).

CTBP represents a collaboration between researchers at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Houston, and is housed on the campus of Rice University, Houston, Texas.

CTBP encompasses a broad array of research and training activities at the forefront of the biology-physics interface. Research within CTBP focuses on the following broadly defined areas: Fundamentals of physical genetics; Interacting active elements and biological functionality; Integrated living systems; and Development of Core Methodology.

If you are interested in a postdoctoral position with CTBP, please apply here.

 

News

Aiden lab wins $3.3M from NIH ENCODE project

Baylor College of Medicine's $3.3 million part of the NIH ENCODE project will be led... Read more

Researchers have discovered that the drug pioglitazone, used to treat diabetes, shows some ability to halt the overexpression of the protein NAF-1, which has been associated with the proliferation of breast cancer. Illustration by Fang Bai

New Tools Join Breast Cancer Fight

International team finds existing drug may halt tumor growth, points way toward more effective treatments.

An international team including Rice University researchers has discovered a way to fight the overexpression of a protein associated with the proliferation of breast cancer... Read more

A computer model of human migration in the Americas by Rice University researchers Dong Wang (left) and Michael Deem could also shed light on the behavior of metastatic cancers. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Study of Human Migration Could Help Understand Cancer Metastasis

What could cancer cells and drug-resistant bacteria possibly have in common with Stone Age settlers of the Americas? They're all migratory, and at one time or other, each finds the going a bit easier in a specific direction.

For cancer cells, the path of least resistance is often along... Read more

Events

Date:
Tue, 03/28/2017 - 12:30
Location:
1060 A/B BioScience Research Collaborative
Date:
Tue, 03/28/2017 - 12:30
Location:
1060 A/B BioScience Research Collaborative
Date:
Tue, 04/04/2017 - 12:30
Location:
1060 A/B BioScience Research Collaborative
Date:
Tue, 04/11/2017 - 12:30
Location:
1060 A/B BioScience Research Collaborative
Date:
Tue, 04/18/2017 - 12:30
Location:
1060 A/B BioScience Research Collaborative
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